Paul Mampilly Loves to Invest in “Disruptification”

“Disruptification” is the word Jenna, a friend of Paul Mampilly, coined to describe the many changes many sectors of the business world is going through right now. It’s not in any dictionary, but it perfectly describes the last few decades, and it’s going to fit the future even more.

Technological advances have disrupted the music industry. Amazon’s Kindle and other ebook readers have disrupted mainstream publishing, along with Amazon’s CreateSpace and other publishing on demand companies. Online news sources have disrupted paper newspapers and magazines. Airbnb has disrupted the hospitality industry just as Lyft and Uber have disrupted taxis.

Paul Mampilly has often written about the megatrends he has spotted. Precision medicine is disrupting the mammoth healthcare industry, and soon will make everybody a lot healthier. Financial technologies will soon disrupt banks, brokerages and payment processors from MasterCard and Visa to Pay Pal. New sources of energy will disrupt old school utility companies, and the transportation industry.

The food industry is shifting to supply consumers with more natural, organic and locally grown foods. Retailers must cater to shoppers of the millennial generation. The construction industry will be transformed by building blocks, 3-D printing and modules.

The incredible thing is, Paul Mampilly points out in a recent blog post, all these changes are coming at once. The world no longer changes a little bit at a time, giving you a chance to get used to cable TV before VCRs come out.

If you snooze, you lose. That goes especially for investors. If you cling to the old companies and old technologies, you will lose. Paul Mampilly sees his job as keeping you awake so you make a fortune on the megatrends. That’s why he writes his newsletter, Profits Unlimited, for Banyan Hill. He spent several decades on Wall Street managing billions of dollars to make wealthy people even wealthier. He walked away from that to help ordinary people turn thousands of dollars into tens of thousands of dollars.

He uses his own Nest thermostat as a good example of the Internet of Things, one of the most powerful megatrends. It knows how warm to keep his house when he’s there. It knows how warm to keep his house when nobody is home. And it knows that automatically. He doesn’t have to keep resetting the thermostat. It’s automatic. This saves him money on his heating and cooling bills by making his use of energy more efficient. And it’s just one small product.

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